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175: Bill Carty on teaching artists to think like ceramic engineers

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Bill Carty. He is a professor of ceramic engineering and materials science at Alfred University. In addition to instructing future ceramic engineers he teaches art students how to develop problem-solving skills for their art practice. In our interview we talk about using data-based experimentation to dispel ceramic myths and how to remedy common issues such as crazing.

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174: The graduate school experience with Brown, Newman-Wise and Lee

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Cory Brown, William Newman-Wise and Yeh Rim Lee. The three are currently in their final year of graduate school at the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred. In our interview we talk about practicing effective time management, developing relationships with faculty, and reckoning with Alfred's ceramic traditions.

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173: Andrea Gill on challenging students to dig deeper

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Andrea Gill. Her large-scale hand-built forms reference historical European vessels, patterns and the figure. Her most recent body of work springs from an ongoing fascination with the patterns of Chinese export ceramics. In the interview we talk about gender dynamics within the ceramic world in the 1960’s, knowing how to get a student to dig deeper in the studio, and her time teaching at the NY State College of Ceramics at Alfred, where she has been on the faculty since 1984.

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172: Wally Higgins on teaching at Alfred University and his time as a Tuskegee Airmen – Special guest Roberto Lugo

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have a double interview featuring Roberto Lugo and Wallace “Wally” Higgins. In the first segment I talk with Roberto about his Instagram project "Our Villages Baby," in which he raises awareness of artists of color and their contributions to the ceramic field.In the second segment I talk with Wally Higgins about his military and ceramic career. In his late teens he enlisted in the Army before going on to serve as one of the Tuskegee Airmen in what is now the U.S. Air Force. He served in Saipan and Oakinawa before returning to the states to get a BFA in ceramic design from Alfred University. After a few years working at the Glidden Pottery he came back to Alfred as a teacher, where he taught glaze materials and mold making. He retired as Professor Emeritus in 1985. Among his many laudits, Wally has been awarded the WW-II Victory Medal, New York State Medal for Merit and two Congressional Gold Medals, the highest honor bestowed on a civilian in the United States.

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171: Bryan Hopkins on deconstructing the porcelain vessel

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Bryan Hopkins. A long-time porcelain vessel maker, he constructs his pieces leaving the seams and joinery visible. The effect hints at the history of refined porcelain production, while also showing the potential for future decay and deconstruction.

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170: Jane Shellenbarger on ego-free teaching

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Jane Shellenbarger. Her ceramic studio practice utilizes atmospheric firing in the creation of pouring and containment vessels. She has been an educator for many years including teaching positions at the Kansas City Art Institute, Northern Michigan University and the School for American Crafts at Rochester Institute of Technology, where she is currently an assistant professor.

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169: Laurie and Peter Pincus on developing complex mold systems

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Peter and Laurie Pincus. The couple live in Rochester, NY where they maintain a studio and Peter teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Peter designs vessels that have up to 170 mold parts, which allow him to visually break the pieces into hundreds of small blocks of color. Beyond being a technical tour-de-force, the pieces often defy visual logic making the viewer question the three-dimensional nature of the pieces.

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166: Margaret Bohls on hand building meaningful pottery

Today on the Tales of a Red Clay Rambler Podcast I have an interview with Margaret Bohls. She lives in Lincoln, NE where she teaches at the University of Nebraska. She maintains a studio practice making functional pottery that references the history of Asian and European ceramics.

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164: Tanner and Baker on setting up a studio

Today on Tales of a Red Clay Rambler I have an interview with Joy Tanner and Will Baker. Together they operate Wood Song Pottery in Bakersville, NC, making individual bodies of atmospheric-fired ceramics. In the interview we talk about being resident artists at the Odyssey Center, striking out to start their own studio, and leaning on the ceramic process for inspiration. 

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